Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (2024)

Review writing decimals in expanded form, and try some practice problems.

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  • DarrielleH

    4 years agoPosted 4 years ago. Direct link to DarrielleH's post “Why are decimals so hard?...”

    Why are decimals so hard? I mean I get all the practice and they just seem so hard once I do them.

    (42 votes)

    • Stephen White

      4 years agoPosted 4 years ago. Direct link to Stephen White's post “Sometimes the concepts gi...”

      Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (4)

      Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (5)

      Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (6)

      Sometimes the concepts give us fits and are hard to understand. You just need to keep practicing, and then before too long you'll have that "AHA" moment where it will all make sense.

      Sometimes I recommend using money to work with decimals. After all, $3.95 and $79.50 are decimals, and if you practice adding money (two items at $3.95), how much will your bill be? If you practice subtracting money (something costs $9.37 and you give a $10.00 bill, how much change will you get)

      Keep at it. You can do it!!

      (119 votes)

  • Ammu

    3 years agoPosted 3 years ago. Direct link to Ammu's post “I don't understand the pr...”

    I don't understand the practice for Decimals in expanded form, Can someone help

    (26 votes)

  • Agvaan/Bobdamoster111

    2 years agoPosted 2 years ago. Direct link to Agvaan/Bobdamoster111's post “Why did math became so po...”

    Why did math became so popluar

    (27 votes)

    • 759560

      2 years agoPosted 2 years ago. Direct link to 759560's post “it did not just people ha...”

      Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (16)

      it did not just people had to use it a lot

      (12 votes)

  • DIONGELA😋😎

    3 years agoPosted 3 years ago. Direct link to DIONGELA😋😎's post “i don't understand (8x100...”

    i don't understand (8x1000)+(6x100)+(2x10)+(4x1+(3x1/100)

    (12 votes)

    • Maximumbrainpower (Inactive Temporarily)

      3 years agoPosted 3 years ago. Direct link to Maximumbrainpower (Inactive Temporarily)'s post “You do all the things in ...”

      Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (20)

      You do all the things in () first before adding them all together. Your question's answer is 8,624.03

      (22 votes)

  • priyanka.katukam.ai

    a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to priyanka.katukam.ai's post “Do u guys like cheese piz...”

    Do u guys like cheese pizza?

    (16 votes)

  • SantiagoA

    2 years agoPosted 2 years ago. Direct link to SantiagoA's post “my "Decimals in expanded ...”

    my "Decimals in expanded from" doesn't work so it put me here.😅

    (20 votes)

    • sam.kari.bruce

      4 months agoPosted 4 months ago. Direct link to sam.kari.bruce's post “haha wow your lucky”

      haha wow your lucky

      (0 votes)

  • BONKER WOPPER

    a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to BONKER WOPPER's post “Why we can have hundredth...”

    Why we can have hundredths and tenths, but not oneths

    (9 votes)

    • Leo Maykell

      a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to Leo Maykell's post “In the context of decimal...”

      Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (31)

      In the context of decimal place values, it's important to understand the concepts of "hundredths" and "tenths." A "hundredth" is equal to 1 divided by 100, which can be represented as 1/100. Similarly, a "tenth" is equal to 1 divided by 10, or 1/10.

      Now, let's consider the term "oneth." Following the same logic, one might assume that "oneth" would be equal to 1 divided by 1, which is simply 1. Therefore, "oneths" are not logically meaningful in the context of fractions.

      In reality, when we divide 1 into 10 equal parts, we call each of these parts a "tenth." Likewise, if we were to divide 1 into 100 equal parts, each part would be referred to as a "hundredth," and so on.

      I hope this clarifies the relationship between decimal place values and fractions for you.

      (14 votes)

  • rat344615

    a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to rat344615's post “what would 345.609 be in ...”

    what would 345.609 be in expanded from

    (9 votes)

    • Your local weirdo

      a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to Your local weirdo's post “300+40+5+.6+.009”

      300+40+5+.6+.009

      (8 votes)

  • lol kitty

    a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to lol kitty's post “what digit is after thous...”

    what digit is after thousandths?

    (4 votes)

    • Ian Pulizzotto

      a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to Ian Pulizzotto's post “In a decimal, the digit a...”

      Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (38)

      In a decimal, the digit after thousandths is ten-thousandths.

      Have a blessed, wonderful day!

      (18 votes)

  • bernice91goff

    3 years agoPosted 3 years ago. Direct link to bernice91goff's post “I definitely need more pr...”

    I definitely need more practice but I cant believe I'm starting to actually like math

    (10 votes)

    • CecilyL

      a year agoPosted a year ago. Direct link to CecilyL's post “omg yes math is amazing, ...”

      omg yes math is amazing, glad you like it!

      (2 votes)

Decimals in expanded form review (article) | Khan Academy (2024)

FAQs

How do you do decimals in expanded form? ›

How to Write a Decimal in an Expanded Form?
  1. Step 1: We start from the left hand side first. We have ones place, i.e., 1.
  2. Step 2: Next, we have the first decimal place, the tenths. We take 2 and multiply it by fraction .
  3. Step 3: Then, we have the hundreds place. ...
  4. Step 4: Finally, we have the thousands place. ...
  5. Example 1.

What is expanded form decimals 6th grade? ›

To write a decimal in expanded form, we need to break down each digit according to its place value. Start with the whole number portion, identifying the hundreds, tens, and ones places. Then, move on to the tenths, hundredths, and thousandths places.

What is the expanded place value form? ›

Writing a number in expanded form involves breaking the number down and showing the place value for each digit. The expanded form of the number 20.03 will be: 20.03 = 2*10 + 0*1+ 0*0.1 + 3*0.01.

How do you write 709.104 in expanded form? ›

How do I write the expanded form of 709.104?
  1. Next, multiply the digits by the value of their respective decimal places. 7 × 100 + 9 × 1 + 1 × 0.1 + 4 × 0.001.
  2. Lastly, add these terms to get the expanded form: 709.104 = 700 + 9 + 0.1 + 0.004.
Jan 18, 2024

What is 83.34 written in expanded form? ›

The expanded form of 83.34 is 80 + 3 + 0.3 + 0.04.

What is 9.076 in expanded form? ›

To express the number 9.076 in expanded form, you break it down by each digit's place value, which results in 9 + 0.07 + 0.006.

What is 689.435 in expanded form? ›

689.435 becomes 600 + 80 + 9 + . 4 + . 03 + . 005.

What is 98795 in expanded form? ›

Thus, we can write the expanded form as. 9 × Ten Thousand + 8 × Thousand + 7 × Hundred + 9 × Ten + 5 × One. = 9 × 10000 + 8 × 1000 + 7 × 100 + 9 × 10 + 5 × 1. = 90000 + 8000 + 700 + 90 + 5. = 98795.

What are the three types of expanded forms? ›

Further, there are three different ways to write numbers in expanded form. The number 4537 can be written in one way of expanded form as 4531 = 4000 + 500 + 30 + 7, in the second way as 4531 = 4 × 1000 + 5 × 100 + 3 × 10 + 7 × 1, and in the third way as 4537 = 4 × thousands + 5 × hundreds + 3 × tens + 7 × ones.

What is expanded form 7th grade? ›

Expanded form is a way to write a number by adding the value of its digits. We can use a place value chart to think of the value of a number's digits.

How to do expanded form with decimals? ›

Expanded Form in Decimals

Writing decimals in expanded form simply means writing each number according to its place value. This is done by multiplying each digit by its place value and adding them together. Let's look at an example: 2.435. In words, we would say this as two and four hundred thirty-five thousandths.

What is the correct expanded form? ›

The expanded form of a number with a decimal or a fraction is written with a base 10-multiple denominator, represented by the power of 10. For example, the number 3.482 in expanded form is written as: 3.482 = 3 + 0.4 + 0.08 + 0.002.

How to write expanded form in words? ›

To write a number in expanded form, write it as the sum of the values of its digits. For example, 631 = 600 + 30 + 1. The name of a number. For example, the word form of 631 is six hundred thirty-one.

What is 3.405 written in expanded form? ›

The correct way to write the number 3.405 in expanded form is 3×1 + 4×1/10 + 5×1/1,000.

How do you write 3.835 in expanded form? ›

Final answer:

To write 3.835 in expanded form using place values, you would write it as 3 x 1 + 8 x 0.1 + 3 x 0.01 + 5 x 0.001.

How do you do decimal expansion? ›

Decimal expansion is completed by converting a fraction into a rational decimal. It is complete in a few steps. If the denominator can be a product of 2s and 5s, use the product exponent rule to create a new denominator with a power of ten. Then, multiply the numerator of the fraction by the power of ten discovered.

What is 56.78 in expanded form? ›

The expanded form of a decimal number breaks it down into its individual place value portions. Here's how you can write the given numbers in the requested format: 56.78: Expanded form: 50 + 6 + 0.7 + 0.08. Place Value Grid Form is represented as such: (5 x 10) + (6 x 1) + (7 x 0.1) + (8 x 0.01).

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